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Living and Working in Space: NASA's Return to the Moon


Grade Level K-4, 5-8, 9-12, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Subject Matter Physical Science
Target Audience Educators,
Informal/ Public
Event Focus This professional development workshop provides an overview of several NASA Education resources while demonstrating specific classroom activities aligned with the theme of Living and Working in Space: NASA's Return to the Moon. In doing this, answering the question: How can I use NASA in my classroom?
Weblink to Program For more details click here

Description

Topics include:
  • Distance to the Moon
  • Physics of Rocketry
  • Micrometeoroids and Space Debris
  • What is a Space Station?
  • General concerns with Living and Working in Space
 
Instructional Objectives
This professional development workshop provides an overview of several NASA Education resources while demonstrating specific classroom activities aligned with the theme of Living and Working in Space: NASA\'s Return to the Moon. In doing this, answering the question: How can I use NASA in my classroom?

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Comments: 7
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Comments


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Living and Working in Space
Written by: Kathleen Brown On: 27 May 2009
I signed up for this program because I wanted my students to have a chance to video teleconference with NASA.  It was the only program that was available.  So I took it.  Then I realized that it was only for teachers.  My students enjoyed the program and the presenter was very understanding, but I think more pre and post activities for kids would be good.  They were not as engaged in the program as the other two teleconferences I have experienced.  We loved the information and preview of the programs offered though, too.  I got a few teachers to attend, too.  I teach Earth Science at Oneida High School in Oneida, NY.  We had been studying the moon and the solar system before the presentation. 


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Integrated english
Written by: Pam On: 27 May 2009

RE: Advice for Bruce,

As an elementary teacher, I am seeking to embed the inquiry model of learning into all activities.  Certainly the NASA videoconferences support this goal.  In terms of my particular program needs, I need to be able to demonstrate how science (particularly space exploration and aeronautics enhance or benefit life on earth.  For example, the NASA recent work on a 'urine converter' is one that has many aspects to it.  We can look at it in terms of social studies, geopgraphy, and even the 'politics' of fresh water.  NASA does an excellent job of demonstrating how their research benefits people on earth and it is my job (as an English teacher to be able to get them to think and write about these ideas and issues.  So, it might be interesting for students to have a blog site where they might converse about their learning after the session -- sometimes students are shy in the moment but have a 'burning question' or idea that might be answered or addressed in a post- session blog.  Just a simple idea.



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Living and Working in Space
Written by: Ms. Sisler On: 27 May 2009
Hello, my name is Ms. Sisler, a teacher at LaFargeville Central School. Last year, my fourth grade class experienced the NASA conference Living and Working in Space and they absolutely enjoyed it. Their fifth grade teacher has mentioned several times this year that she is surprised with how much information they retained and use this year. I've been preparing this year's class for another conference and been more involved preparing for the conference than last year. (I think I enjoy it more than the students!) So thank you and keep up the great work! Sincerely, Ms. Sisler


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Any advice?
Written by: Bruce Howard On: 26 May 2009

Hi Pam,

I'm wondering about the title of your comment. Did you use this in a language arts class? How did you integrate it?

For people who run this program in the future, what would you do differently next time?



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language Arts Integrated Science/Social Studies
Written by: Pam Crawford On: 26 May 2009
All of NASA's educational programs are of the highest calibre.  As a class,we are very impressed!  We like the interactivity part and the ability to talk to experts.  Thank you for such wonderful learning opportunities.


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Living and Working in Space
Written by: Amelia Glover On: 26 May 2009
I believe this program was very well put together, very informative, the students enjoy it and always looking for more.  The students ask for more activities, more involement, and the time to be expanded to at least 2hrs. for Q&A. 


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Student Version
Written by: NASA DLN On: 13 Feb 2009
This videoconferencing module was designed as a "professional development" module where the presenter will talk about some of the topics associated with the theme of "Living and Working in Space" while identifying NASA resources that compliment each topic. However, many NASA Digital Learning Network users are signing up for the program for thei students... The question I have is: Should we create a seperate version (with pre and post activities) for students, or leave the catalog entry as is?

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