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Home NASA Connections Our Magnificent Sun

Our Magnificent Sun


Grade Level K-4, 1, 2
Subject Matter Physical Science
Target Audience Students
Event Focus What is the sun?
Weblink to Program For more details click here

Description
What is the Sun?  What are sunspots?  Science begins with questions and young children have many.  This program, specially designed for a kindergarten through second grade audience, will help students answer their questions about the Sun.  In this highly interactive session, children will illustrate features of the sun by participating in a story time with NASA.   To help review the new concepts, the children will learn a song about the sun.  Come along and learn about the Sun with NASA.
Instructional Objectives

Primary grade students have many misconceptions about the Sun.  For example, many younger children believe the Sun is solid, smooth, and yellow.  This videoconference will begin to address some common misconceptions.  At the beginning of the videoconference, students will create a list of at least 6 objects found in the sky.  Next students will illustrate 3 important features of the Sun.  To demonstrate mastery, students will discuss how the Sun and the earth are connected.


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Comments: 10
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Comments


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Activities for grades 5-8 addressing Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: test On: 01 Sep 2009

When is the next Sun-Earth Day?



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Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: Tim Van Heule On: 03 Jun 2009
We had about 20 classes participate in this program this year and it was very well received. We were fortunate to participate with the Langley, JPL, Goddard, and Dryden Centers. Even though the program format is the same, the different "touches" that each presenter puts on the program is interesting - they really own it. Some of the program can be "over the heads" of first graders - but I feel that the exposure to new information greatly benefits the students in the long run.


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Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: Eileen Moschetti On: 01 Jun 2009
This was my first year participating.  My first graders loved it!  It was nice to have a program geared to their age level and reinforced what they have learned.  They actively engaged the children and were responsive to their questions.


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Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: Janeen Yacovelli On: 29 May 2009

This is an excellent program for younger children.  I have done this with both 1st and 2nd graders.  The presenters are interesting and hold the attention of the children.  The kids learn and have fun at the same time!  I would highly recommend this DL event to teachers teaching about the sun and/or sun spots to younger children.



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Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: Lee Hall On: 29 May 2009
I highly recommend this program. I have used it with several different schools and K, 1, and 2 students. The presenters do a great job adjusting to the different grades and know just when to change activities to keep the students paying attention. Mr. Merrifield makes it so much fun the students don't even realize they are learning. Every teacher has been impressed with how much information the children retain from these activities. We will be registering classes again next year. Thanks, NASA.


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Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: LaurieRuberg On: 29 May 2009

Mary Ann and Carola,

Your comments about using the DLN Magnificent Sun program with your young students are inspiring.  It's wonderful that in addition to the students being fully engaged in the presentation that you both had so much fun with the related activities.  I especially like Carola's comment: We learned how to graph, create shapes, edit shapes, format shapes, set transitions. Keep in mind this was one teacher with 44 first graders in a computer lab. You really accomplished a lot with this DLN program and related activities.  

Thanks for sharing your successful and fun experiences with the Mag Sun DLN.



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Mag Sun
Written by: Mary Ann Magliacano On: 29 May 2009
I have been working wirth NASA with Video Conferencing for over 7 years.  One of my favorites was this conference, Our Magnificient Sun.  I love the interactiveness of it.  I have a K - 4 building and even my little first graders went away from this conference chatting about what they just learned.  Isn't that was it is all about?


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Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: Carola Lowe On: 28 May 2009

I've done this one about 20 times now. Love it. The presenters at Langely are a riot and work with Kindergarteners and first graders very well.  Actually they are great but Troy and Dan make you fall out of your chair literally. With my first graders last year after our interaction with NASA created a graph documenting how many sun spots there were each day. >Then took that data and created a power point out of it. It was too cool because you could really see the sun spots go across the sun in the powerpoint when you advanced the slide settings to fast. The kids loved it and it was easy to do.  We learned how to graph, create shapes, edit shapes, format shapes, set transitions. Keep in mind this was one teacher with 44 first graders in a computer lab. Couldn't do it with my Kindergarten class unless I had a very small group. Anyway, it was a blast and a great extenstion activity.  I sent it to Troy at the end of the year. I hope they liked it as much as we had fun working on it. Later I put it on our school webpage.



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Activities for grades 5-8 addressing Our Magnificent Sun
Written by: LaurieRuberg On: 14 May 2009

Hi David,

I highly recommend the Sun-Earth Day website as a great resource for materials about the Sun for middle school students.  Here is the Sun-Earth Day web address: http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2009/getinvolved/ed.php

Right in the middle of the Sun-Earth Day web page you'll find links for middle school activities.  One of the activities featured is, "Exploring Magnetism."  The theme for Sun Earth Day 2010 is Magnetic Storms.  The Sun Earth Educational Forum will be featuring activities on magnetism.  Sun-Earth Day activities will begin in September by featuring the Super Storm of 1859 -You can see it all on YouTube with Dr, Sten Odenwald at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSfAI6_7bjU

 I hope this resource is helpful to you!



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Ideas
Written by: David On: 13 Feb 2009

I'd be interested in any ideas for content for grades 5-8th grade on Our Magnificent Sun which is normally targeted for grades K-2.

 

Thanks 

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